New Alpha-Gal Syndrome MMWR Publications

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There are two new reports published by the CDC’s journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) on alpha-gal syndrome (AGS), also known as the red meat allergy. AGS is an emerging tick bite associated allergic condition to most mammalian meat. These reports highlight that “AGS is of increasing concern for public health, but many healthcare providers (HCPs) are unaware of the condition and how to diagnose or manage it.”

The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (Thompson, J. M., et al.) 07.28.2023, published the first report “Geographic Distribution of Suspected Alpha-gal Syndrome Cases — United States, January 2017-December 2022.” This report aims to make public health agencies and healthcare providers aware of AGS case hotspots in the United States in order to recognize the impact AGS is having in the country. Most cases were reported in the southern, midwestern, and mid-Atlantic United States.

The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (Carpenter, A., et al.) 07.28.2023, published the second report “Health Care Provider Knowledge Regarding Alpha-gal Syndrome — United States, March–May 2022.” This report is the first national survey to assess healthcare provider’s knowledge of AGS. Approximately 42% of the United State’s Healthcare providers had never heard of AGS, with only 29% of providers who knew of the condition knowledgeable to diagnosis it. The report highlights the need for further awareness and education of AGS to help improve patient care in the United States.

The CDC, in collaboration with Medscape, is providing a free CME/CE training so learners are better able to self-assess gaps in their knowledge regarding the diagnosis and management of patients with AGS. Providers can access the training below.


For more information:

Read the full MMWR report on the Geographic Distribution of Suspected Alpha-gal Syndrome Cases here.

Read the full MMWR report on Health Care Provider Knowledge Regarding Alpha-gal Syndrome here.

Providers can access the free CME/CE training here.

Read more about Alpha-Gal Syndrome on LDA’s website here.