LDA President Speaks About the Spread of Dangerous TBD on NJ 101.5 Radio

Image of lone star ticks
Lone star ticks. Credit: Jim Occi, Ph.D., Rutgers, CVD, and LDA Medical & Professional Advisory Board member

On 4.4.23, Lyme Disease Association, Inc. (LDA) President, Pat Smith, was interviewed on radio, NJ 101.5 by Host David Matthau, about the multiple dangerous tick-borne diseases in the State. A summary article about the in-depth and informative interview of Ms. Smith was posted by the station to nj1015.com on 4.12.23.

In addition to addressing the well-known threat of Lyme disease, Pat had the opportunity during the radio interview to elaborate on other lesser-known yet serious tick-borne pathogens that are spreading throughout the state such as anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, Powassan virus, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Southern tick-associated rash illness, among others. She also discussed the tick vectors of each disease, symptoms, and whether there are available tests and/or available treatments.

In the interview, Pat stressed the importance of tick checks and getting prompt medical attention whenever a tick bite is suspected or confirmed.

About 101.5 Radio: Polls indicate 101.5 is the top talk radio station in NJ.

About the Tick Images: The LDA supplied tick images from its files from LDA Medical & Professional Advisory Board member, Jim Occi, Ph.D., Rutgers, CVD. The images were used in the 101.5 website article.

About the Host: David Matthau has been covering New Jersey news for more than 25 years and served as New Jersey 101.5’s lead investigative reporter since 2000. He has reported on a number of breaking news stories, including the COVID-19 pandemic, the 9/11 Terror Attacks, the Jersey based Anthrax Attack Investigation, the resignation of Governor Jim McGreevey, Hurricane Irene, and Superstorm Sandy as well as the terror bomb attack down the shore. He has received a number of awards.


For more information:

Read the written article on nj1015.com.

David Matthau – New Jersey 101.5