1

Research Grant Application Package

LDA is committed to funding Lyme and tick-borne diseases research leading to better diagnostics, treatment, and cure. Click here for prior grant award descriptions.

Grant application package links are below. (You can download the Microsoft Word Version, or the PDF.)

Grant Application – Research Projects

Microsoft Word

PDF

Grant Application for Extension of Existing Grants – Research Projects

Microsoft Word

PDF




Conference Presentations from LDA Funding

The LDA has a long history of funding/supporting research projects. Below is a sample list of conference presentations that were made by researchers who received LDA funding for the work that was presented. The authors shown in green were the researchers who were provided the funding for the work that was presented, although multiple researchers on the article may have shared in the award.


11. Presented at the 2019 LDA/Columbia CME Lyme Conference – Lyme & Other Tick-Borne Diseases

From Bench to Bedside: Anti-Neuronal Autoantibodies in Lyme Disease and Beyond

Published on January 7, 2020
Anti-lysoganglioside and other anti-neuronal autoantibodies in post-treatment Lyme Disease and Erythema Migrans after repeat infection

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2666354619300158?via%3Dihub
Brian A. Fallon, Barbara Strobino, SeanReim, JulieStoner, Madeleine W. Cunningham

Abstract: Background: Molecular mimicry targeting neural tissue has been reported after Borrelia burgdorferi(Bb) infection. Herein, we investigate whether antineuronal autoantibodies are increased and whether antibody-mediated signaling of neuronal cells is elevated in a cohort of symptomatic adults with a history of Lyme Disease (LD). Methods: Participants (n ​= ​179) included 24 with recent Erythema Migrans (EM) without prior LD, 8 with recent EM and prior LD (EM ​+ ​prior LD), 119 with persistent post-treatment LD symptoms (PTLS), and 28 seronegative endemic controls with no prior LD history. Antineuronal immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured by standard ELISA and compared with mean titers of normal age-matched sera against lysoganglioside, tubulin, and dopamine receptors (D1R and D2R). Antibody-mediated signaling of calcium calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity in a human neuronal cell line (SK-N-SH) was identified in serum. Results: EM ​+ ​prior LD cases had higher antibody titers than controls for anti-lysoganglioside GM1 (p ​= ​0.002), anti-tubulin (p ​= ​0.03), and anti-D1R (p ​= ​0.02), as well as higher expression in the functional antibody-mediated CaMKII Assay (p ​= ​0.03). The EM cases with no prior history showed no significant differences on any measures. The PTLS cases demonstrated significantly higher titers (p ​= ​0.01) than controls on anti-lysoganglioside GM1, but not for the other measures. Conclusion: The finding of elevated anti-neuronal autoantibodies in our small sample of those with a prior history of Lyme disease but not in those without prior Lyme disease, if replicated in a larger sample, suggests an immune priming effect of repeated infection; the CaMKII activation suggests that antineuronal antibodies have functional significance. The elevation of anti-lysoganglioside antibodies among those with PTLS is of particular interest given the established role of anti-ganglioside antibodies in peripheral and central neurologic diseases. Future prospective studies can determine whether these autoantibodies emerge after Bb infection and whether their emergence coincides with persistent neurologic or neuropsychiatric symptoms.


10. Presented at the 2019 LDA/Columbia CME Lyme Conference – Lyme & Other Tick-Borne Diseases

The possible association between the human ABCB1 gene and Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome

Published September 2019. Online May 2019
Genetic Variation in the ABCB1 Gene Associated with Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome Status

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214540019300489
Joanna Lyon, Hyunuk Seung

Abstract: Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) poses a difficult to understand health issue. This multi-centered, randomized control trial studied the possible correlation between ABCB1 (MDR1) gene variants and the incidence of PTLDS in affected patients. Genomic DNA was isolated and analyzed for four ABCB1 gene SNPs (rs1128503, rs1045642, rs2235067, and rs4148740). Significant findings include the association of rs1128503 TC variant with PTLDS status. Additionally, the rs1128503+ rs1045642+ rs2235067 SNP combination increased rs1128503 genotype TC significance to 3.83 times the rs1128503 genotype CC. The TT variant of rs4148740 in conjunction with rs1128503 reduced the odds ratio and appeared to convey a PTLDS protective status to the rs1128503 TC variant.


 
9. Presented at the 2017 LDA/Columbia CME Lyme Conference – Lyme & Other Tick-Borne Diseases
 
Host-Specific Antiviral Responses to the Tick-Borne Flaviviruses: Powassan and TBEV
 
Published June 26, 2017
Interferon signaling in Peromyscus leucopus confers a potent and specific restriction to vector-borne flaviviruses
 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5484488/
Adaeze O. Izuogu, Kristin L. McNally, Stephen E. Harris, Brian H. Youseff, John B. Presloid, Christopher Burlak, Jason Munshi-South, Sonja M. Best, and R. Travis Taylor
 
ABSTRACT: Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFVs), including Powassan virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus cause encephalitis or hemorrhagic fevers in humans with case-fatality rates ranging from 1–30%. Despite severe disease in humans, TBFV infection of natural rodent hosts has little noticeable effect. Currently, the basis for resistance to disease is not known. We hypothesize that the coevolution of flaviviruses with their respective hosts has shaped the evolution of potent antiviral factors that suppress virus replication and protect the host from lethal infection. In the current study, we compared virus infection between reservoir host cells and related susceptible species. Infection of primary fibroblasts from the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus, a representative host) with a panel of vector-borne flaviviruses showed up to a 10,000-fold reduction in virus titer compared to control Mus musculus cells. Replication of vesicular stomatitis virus was equivalent in P. leucopus and M. musculus cells suggesting that restriction was flavivirus-specific. Step-wise comparison of the virus infection cycle revealed a significant block to viral RNA replication, but not virus entry, in P. leucopus cells. To understand the role of the type I interferon (IFN) response in virus restriction, we knocked down signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) or the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR1) by RNA interference. Loss of IFNAR1 or STAT1 significantly relieved the block in virus replication in P. leucopus cells. The major IFN antagonist encoded by TBFV, nonstructural protein 5, was functional in P. leucopus cells, thus ruling out ineffective viral antagonism of the host IFN response. Collectively, this work demonstrates that the IFN response of P. leucopus imparts a strong and virus-specific barrier to flavivirus replication. Future identification of the IFN-stimulated genes responsible for virus restriction specifically in P. leucopus will yield mechanistic insight into efficient control of virus replication and may inform the development of antiviral therapeutics.
 

8. Presented at the LDA/Columbia CME Lyme Conference – Lyme & Other Tick-Borne Diseases: New Strategies to Tackle an Expanding Epidemic, Oct. 16, 2016, St. Paul, Minnesota

Eradication of Borrelia Persisters for More Effective Treatment of Lyme Disease

(Published 3 days later, as Ceftriaxone Pulse Dosing Fails to Eradicate Biofilm-like Microcolony B. burgdorferi Persisters Which Are Sterilized by Daptomycin/Doxycycline/Cefuroxime Drug Combination without Pulse Dosing)

Jie Feng, Shuo Zhang, Wanliang Shi, Ying Zhang
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01744/pdf

Abstract: Although the majority of Lyme disease patients can be cured, at least 10-20% of the patients continue to suffer from persisting symptoms such as fatigue, muscular and joint pain, and neurologic impairment after standard 2-4 week antibiotic treatment. While the causes for this post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms are unclear, one possibility is due to B. burgdorferi persisters that are not effectively killed by current antibiotics such as doxycycline or amoxicillin used to treat Lyme disease. A previous study showed that four rounds of ceftriaxone pulse dosing treatment eradicated B. burgdorferi persisters in vitro using a relatively young late log phase culture (5 day old). In this study, we investigated if ceftriaxone pulse dosing could also eradicate B. burgdorferi persisters in older stationary phase cultures (10 day old) enriched with more resistant microcolony form of persisters. We found that ceftriaxone pulse dosing could only eradicate planktonic log phase B. burgdorferi spirochetal forms and round body forms but not more resistant aggregated biofilm-like microcolony persisters enriched in stationary phase cultures. Moreover, we found that not all drugs are suitable for pulse dosing, with bactericidal drugs ceftriaxone and cefuroxime being more appropriate for pulse dosing than bacteriostatic drug doxycycline and persister drug daptomycin. We also showed that drug combination pulse dosing treatment was more effective than single drug pulse dosing. Importantly, we demonstrate that pulse dosing treatment impaired the activity of the persister drug daptomycin and its drug combination against B. burgdorferi persisters and that the most effective way to kill the more resistant biofilm-like microcolonies is the daptomycin/doxycycline/ceftriaxone triple drug combination without pulse dosing. Our findings indicate pulse dosing may not always work as a general principle but rather depends on the specific drugs used, with cidal drugs being more appropriate for pulse dosing than static or persister drugs, and that drug combination approach with persister drugs is more effective at killing the more resistant microcolony form of persisters than pulse dosing. These observations may have implications for more effective treatment of Lyme disease. Future studies are required to validate these findings in animal models of B. burgdorferi persistence.

7. Northeast Natural History Conference, Syracuse, NY 2012

A Survey of Tick Populations Along the Connecticut River in Vermont

A.C. Serra, A.R. Giese Lyndon State College, VT

ABSTRACT: Ixodes scapularis (Black-legged Tick) has expanded its range in recent decades. To establish baseline data on the abundance of the Black-legged Tick and Borrelia burgdorferi (the causative agent of Lyme disease) at the edge of a putative range expansion, we collected 1398 ticks from five locations along the Connecticut River in Vermont. Collection locations were approximately evenly distributed between the villages of Ascutney and Guildhall. Relative abundance and distribution by species varied across sites. Black-legged Ticks dominated our collections (n = 1348, 96%), followed by Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Rabbit Tick; n = 45, 3%), and Dermacentor variabilis (American Dog Tick; n = 5, <1%). Black-legged Tick abundance ranged from 6198 ticks per survey hectare (all life stages combined) at the Thetford site to zero at the Guildhall site. There was little to no overlap of tick species across sites. Phenology of Black-legged Ticks matched published information from other regions of the northeastern USA. Prevalence of B. burgdorferi in adult Black-legged Ticks was 8.9% (n = 112)


6. Presented at 2009 Columbia University/LDA national Lyme & Tick-Borne Diseases: 34 Years From Lyme Connecticut Across the Nation scientific conference and at Jacksonville State University Spring 2010 conference.

Investigations of Human Borreliosis in the Southern US

Kerry Clark, PHD University of N. Florida

ABSTRACT: This study address the hypothesis that lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum), in addition to blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis), serve as vectors of Bbsl to humans. The study results are expected to confirm a previously unrecognized genetic group of Bbsl as the cause of a significant portion of LB cases in the U.S., to estimate the rate of infection in ticks biting humans in the southern U.S., to provide evidence of the tick species responsible for transmitting Lyme Borrelia to humans in southern states, and to provide improved methods for DNA testing and identification of Lyme Borrelia in human patient samples.

History: Dr. Clark’s research is focused on the ecology and epidemiology of Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases in the southern U.S. He collaborated with investigators at Georgia Southern University in several studies, including those leading to the first isolations and characterizations of B. burgdorferi in South Carolina. Dr. Clark and colleagues have documented the presence of several Lyme Borrelia species infecting small mammals, ticks, and lizards in Florida and South Carolina. He was the first to ever report finding Lyme disease spirochetes infecting wild reptiles. More recently, he has focused his investigative efforts on the cause of Lyme-like illness in humans in the southern U.S.

Objectives: The primary objectives of his research and service activities are the following: (1) to learn more about the ecology and epidemiology of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases affecting humans in the U.S.; (2) to improve early detection and diagnosis by developing better diagnostic tests; and (3) to educate clinicians, public health personnel and the general public about the presence, identification, and prevention of tick-borne infections.


5. Presented at LDA Columbia University Lyme & Other Tick-Borne Diseases: Solutions through Cutting Edge Science 2008

Profiling the humoral response to Borrelia burgdorferi infection with protein microarrays
New Insights from the Borrelia Genome

Benjamin J Luft PhD Stony Brook University, NY

ABSTRACT: Dr. Luft spoke about studies including studies of different strains of Bb to identify virulence markers, which have investigated gene expression in B. Burgdorferi. He reported that under laboratory conditions around half of the potential 1400 Borrelia proteins are expressed. Conditions such as pH and temperature can be varied and the effects on gene expression can be studied.


4. Presented to the 6th Annual Lyme & Other Tick-Borne Diseases: Emerging Tick-Borne Diseases Conference on October 28, 2005 in Philadelphia Pennsylvania
Lyme Disease Association and Columbia University, conference co-sponsors.

Results from Lyme Disease Clinical Treatment Trial

Daniel Cameron, MD Private practice, NY

ABSTRACT: Methods: Data were obtained from a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study of patients with recurrent Lyme disease. Patients received either amoxicillin 500mg. 3 times/day or placebo for 3 months. The Short Form-36 Health Survey, administered at baseline and at the conclusion, provided a Mental Component Summary (MCS) and a Physical Component Summary (PCS) for HRQOL.  Baseline HRQOL scores were compared with the general US and chronically-ill populations. Patients with Lyme disease were divided into the lowest, moderate, and higher initial quality of life as measured by SF-36.

Results: The quality of life of Lyme disease was significantly lower than the US norm and chronically-ill patients on all SF-36 scales.  Compared with patients who received placebo, patients treated with amoxicillin showed greater improvement on SF-36 physical function, general health perception, vitality, social function, and emotional health. Lyme disease patient presenting with the best initial quality of life had the highest success rate.
Conclusion: Recurrent Lyme disease severely impairs quality of life.  Retreatment is effective.


3.(1) A poster presentation by at the 14th International Conference on Lyme Disease & Other Tick-Borne Disorders in Farmington, Connecticut on April 21-23, 2001.

Recovery of Lyme Spirochetes in Semen Samples of Previously Diagnosed Patients

(2) Dr. Bach also presented results of the study at the American Psychiatric Association meeting in November 2000. The presentation was mentioned in Alternative Medicine, May 2001.

Gregory Bach, DO, PC Private practice, PA

ABSTRACT: The findings were that 43% of the males tested carried evidence of the Lyme disease bacterium in semen by PCR DNA testing.


2. 13th International Scientific Conference on Lyme Disease & Other Tick-borne Disorders. CONFERENCE POSTER PRESENTATION 3/2000

Preliminary in Vitro and in Vivo Findings of Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment in Experimental Bb Infection.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/432883#4

Charles Pavia, PhD NY Medical College School of Medicine, NYCOM Microbiology and Immunodiagnostic Laboratory of NYIT.

ABSTRACT: In these studies, we evaluated repeated HBOT for its ability to kill Bb in vitro, and in vivo, in a murine model of Lyme disease. Several North American tick-derived and recently obtained patient isolates were studied separately in our assay systems. To test for in vitro susceptibility, one-half to one million Bb were cultured in a small volume (0.1 – 0.2 ml) of BSK media using small snap-cap test tubes. With the caps removed, these cultures were then exposed, for one hour (twice daily for 2 consecutive days), to pure, filtered oxygen pressurized to 2-3 times normal atmospheric conditions. This was achieved using a specially constructed, miniaturized cylindrical chamber (length = 12 inches; diameter = 8 inches), equipped to accept any pressurized gas mixture through its portal opening. After the final HBOT, all cultures received an additional 0.5 ml of BSK media (making the final volume now 0.6 – 0.7 ml), and their caps were snapped shut. Matching control cultures received no HBOT. All cultures were incubated at 33° C for 2-3 days and were examined microscopically for live Bb. Our results showed that 14 of 17 strains of Bb had their growth inhibited by 33-94%, while there was little or no inhibition of 3 Bb strains. For the in vivo studies, separate groups of C3H or CO1 mice were infected intradermally with 100,000 Bb. Two to 4 weeks later, one group of infected mice received two, 1.0-1.5 hour HBO exposures, for two consecutive or alternating days. The treated mice were sacrificed one day after the last treatment, and extract cultures of their urinary bladders were prepared in BSK media. It was found that no Bb grew out of 80% of these extract cultures, whereas live Bb organisms were recoverable from 90% of extract cultures prepared from matched, infected control mice not treated with HBO. These data suggest that HBOT may be considered as a clinically useful form of adjunct therapy in the treatment of Lyme disease.


1. Abstract ACR 61st National Scientific Meeting. November 8-12 1997 Washington, DC * CONFERENCE PRESENTATION

PCR Evidence for Borrelia Burgdorferi DNA in Synovium in Absence of Positive Serology.

H. Ralph Schumacher, MD, P. Branigan, Jay Rao, H. Gerard, A. Hudson, W. Williams, T. Arayssi, M. Bayer, S. Rothfuss, G. Clayburne, M. Sieck

U of Pa, Allegheny University of Health Sciences and VAMC, Phila. PA 19104 and NIAMS, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892

ABSTRACT: Although Borrelia burgdorferi have been identified in synovium by several groups using ilmmunohistochemistry, EM Steiner stains and PCR, there is controversy about whether they can infect joints without inducing a serologic response and whether they can persist after antibiotic treatment. We have performed PCR for Borrelia on a series of 185 synovial biopsies and synovial fluid regardless of clinical diagnosis. There were no cases included with known clinical Lyme disease or with positive Lyme ELISA serology.  A positive control was from an erythema migrans lesion with known Lyme disease. PCR primers used identified Borrelia burgdorferi Osp A DNA. In 6 PCR positive cases synovium was a1so studied by Steiner stain and 4 had transmission EM to search for evidence of organisms.

Ten of the 185 cases studied (5, 3%) and the positive control were positive for the Osp A gene of Borrelia burgdorferi. Steiner stains were negative in all 6 studied. EM in no cases revealed any classic organisms but did show several features (including a variety of unusual membranous arrays) that have been reported before in known Lyme disease and other infections.  Clinical patterns were reviewed on the Borrelia PCR positive patients. Clinical diagnoses were RA in 4, Adult Onset Stills Disease or JRA in 2, reactive arthritis in 2, psoriatic 1, and unclassified oligoarthritis 1. Four had received extensive antibiotics before the biopsy with improvement in 2.

PCR evidence for Borrelia has been identified in synovial biopsies of patients with clinical pictures that had not initially suggested Lyme disease. All patients were negative for antibodies to Borrelia and some were PCR positive in synovium despite previous treatment with antibiotics.


Click here for Publications LDA-Funded research

 


 

 
Lyme Disease Association, Inc. July 2013
PO Box 1438 Jackson, NJ 08527
www.LymeDiseaseAssociation.org
888-366-6611



Fallon Study Published – Questionnaire to Assess Symptom Burden in Lyme Patients

alt
Brian A. Fallon, MD

Brian A. Fallon, Nevena Zubcevik et al. published an article in Frontiers in Medicine, December 6, 2019, The General Symptom Questionnaire-30 (GSQ-30): A Brief Measure of Multi-System Symptom Burden in Lyme Disease.

Conclusions and Relevance of the study:
“The GSQ-30 is a valid and reliable instrument to assess symptom burden among patients with acute and post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome and is sensitive in the detection of change after treatment among patients with erythema migrans. The GSQ-30 should prove useful in clinical and research settings to assess multi-system symptom burden and to monitor change over time. The GSQ-30 may also prove useful in future precision medicine studies as a clinical measure to correlate with disease-relevant biomarkers.”

Dr. Fallon received LDA grant support for the project, and the resultant publication is the 52nd peer reviewed publication which focuses on LDA-supported research.

Click here for the publication
Click here for all 52 journal articles




Lyme Disease Association – Incoming Grants

The Lyme Disease Association (LDA) is 501(c) (3) national charity. It is unique since it is an all volunteer national non profit, thus approximately 97% of funds go directly to programs. LDA depends upon public contributions and upon grants to perform its mission: Lyme and tick-borne diseases research funding, education, prevention, and patient support.

Grants are gifts of money that generally come from charitable trusts and foundations, public bodies, or corporations. They are tax exempt and usually come with specific conditions such as for a particular area of research or within certain time frames and may require a written report.

LDA at a Glance
Click to the following two links for a quick look at what LDA has accomplished to date with the contributions and grants it has received.

Research & Educational Grants Awarded 1992 to 2019

LymeAid 4 Kids Grants Awarded 2004 to 2019


Considering giving a grant to LDA? Need more information about LDA for this purpose? 
Email president@LymeDiseaseAssociation.org




Genetics & Chronic Lyme: A Link?

Joanna Lyon
Joanna Lyon, PharmD, MEd, MHS, CHES, BCGP

Joanna Lyon and Hyunuk Seung, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, published an article in Meta Gene, May 2019 (online), Genetic Variation in the ABCB1 Gene Associated with Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome Status.  A possible genetic connection in PTLDS/chronic Lyme was studied: “This multi-centered, randomized control trial studied the possible correlation between ABCB1 (MDR1) gene variants and the incidence of Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) in affected patients,” and found “a significant association with PTLDS and patients with the rs1128503 variant allele TC on the ABCB1 gene.”

Dr. Lyon received LDA grant support for the project, and the resultant publication is the 51st peer reviewed publication which focuses on LDA-supported research. (Dr. Lyon will be lecturing on this topic at the LDA/Columbia Scientific CME Conference, September 21 & 22, 2019 in Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Lyon Bio/Talk Summary)

LDA-supported research: Articles range from the 1996 ground-breaking, Borrelia burgdorferi DNA in the Urine of Treated Patients with Chronic Lyme Disease Symptoms: A PCR Study of 97 Cases, by the late Manfred Bayer in the journal Infection to articles in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Neurology, Genetics, Gene, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Journal of the American Medical Association, Biochemistry, Veterinary Sciences, Clinical Infectious Disease, Journal of International Neuropsychological Society, Ticks and Tick-Borne Diseases, to Meta Gene in 2019.

Researchers funded include, Drs. Ying Zhang, Brian Fallon, Ed Breitschwerdt, Steven Schutzer, Travis Taylor, Eva Sapi, Kerry Clark, Dan Cameron, Mario Phillip, Ben Luft and many more from across the U.S.

Other ground-breaking studies LDA has suppported with grants include:

Click here for all 51 journal articles

LDA Research Funding Results Summary




LDA Celebrates 50!

LDAUSALogo original loIn 2018, Lyme Disease Association Inc. (LDA) reached a milestone in its Lyme research support −the 50th journal article with LDA supported research was published. Articles found in 39 different journals begin in 1996 with the ground-breaking, Borrelia burgdorferi DNA in the Urine of Treated Patients with Chronic Lyme Disease Symptoms: A PCR Study of 97 Cases, by the late Manfred Bayer in the journal Infection.

Journals range from The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Neurology, Genetics, Gene, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Journal of the American Medical Association, Biochemistry, Veterinary Sciences, Clinical Infectious Disease, Journal of International Neuropsychological Society to the most recent, Ticks and Tick-Borne Diseases.

Researchers funded include, Drs. Ying Zhang, Brian Fallon, Ed Breitschwerdt, Steven Schutzer, Travis Taylor, Eva Sapi, Kerry Clark, Ben Luft and many more from across the U.S.

Other ground-breaking studies include:

Click here to link to all 50!



Ways to Support the LDA

We need your help to continue our current programs, to develop new materials/services to meet the increasing needs of increasing disease burden, and to fund research to find a cure for this debilitating disease.Please join us in this fight. Working together, we can help our states, communities, families, friends, and neighbors.  

 

Let’s Work Together To Fight Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases

The Lyme Disease Association’s (LDA) goals are to find a cure for Lyme disease and to prevent others from acquiring Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.    According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), 328,128 Lyme disease cases were reported nationwide from 1990 through 2008. Since CDC has indicated only 10% of cases meeting the CDC surveillance criteria are actually reported, approximately 3,281,280 new cases of Lyme occurred over that time period nationwide.  Education, prevention and research are vitally important to help reduce the impact this epidemic is having on our nation and to minimize the suffering and pain caused by Lyme disease.

We need your help to continue our current programs, to develop new materials/services to meet the increasing needs of increasing disease burden, and to fund research to find a cure for this debilitating disease.  Please join us in this fight. Working together, we can help our states, communities, families, friends, and neighbors.

What We can do for You

 

1.    Provide educational in-services for your employees.

2.    Provide professional brochures on Lyme and tick-borne diseases for your employees.

3.    Maintain a website that provides access to free educational material on types of ticks, various diseases carried by them, symptoms of diseases, prevention strategies, proper tick removal, and free referrals to “Lyme literate physicians and support groups.

4.   Maintain a toll free information line on Lyme disease.

 

How This Can Help Your Company

 

1.   Prevent Lyme and tick-borne diseases for employees and families

2.   Reduce absenteeism

3.   Reduce medical insurance costs

4.   Reduce disability/workmen’s comp costs

5.   Reduce temp costs to replace absent employees with Lyme or who have family members with Lyme

6.   Save lives. Tick-borne diseases can kill

 

What You Can do for Us

 

       Provide grants or cash donations so that LDA can meet its program goals.

e.g., A corporate cash grant enables us to continue awarding cutting edge research grants that bring us closer to a cure.

 

       Donate office equipment that will assist us in developing and enriching our programs.

e.g., Computers, copiers, printers, projectors 

 

       Include the LDA in corporate giving campaigns.

e.g., Encourage employee donations through the matching of employee funds given to the LDA.

4.       Enable employee in-kind involvement.

e.g., Employees with professional expertise can volunteer for the organization, perhaps even during selected work time: PR, website services, marketing

 

5.       Sponsor events and educational brochures.

e.g., Supporting events such as LDA’s Lyme walk/ 5k run, LDA’s scientific conference, sponsorship of brochures which are often provided for free

 

       Provide PR for LDA through company newsletters, websites, etc.

 

       Donate supplies for LDA events

e.g., Food, paper products, other consumables

 

 




LymeAid 4 Kids: Lyme Disease Association & Amy Tan, Partners

Amy Tan Lyme disease organizations to donate toInternationally acclaimed author Amy Tan said the following this week to LDA in continued support of its LymeAid 4 Kids fund “My heart goes out to undiagnosed children who face not only the painful and debilitating effects of this disease but are at risk for a lifetime of poor self-esteem.” Ms. Tan, herself a victim of chronic Lyme disease with neurologic symptoms, approached the LDA in 2003.

LymeAid 4 Kids Logo Lyme Disease Association, Inc. 2014 SmallInternationally acclaimed author Amy Tan said the following this week to Lyme Disease Association (LDA) in continued support of its LymeAid 4 Kids fund “My heart goes out to undiagnosed children who face not only the painful and debilitating effects of this disease but are at risk for a lifetime of poor self-esteem.” Ms. Tan, herself a victim of chronic Lyme disease with neurologic symptoms, approached the LDA in 2003. Recognized that an early diagnosis and proper early treatment may prevent patients from developing the serious manifestations which often result from chronic Lyme disease, she wanted to stop children from developing chronic Lyme and wanted the LDA to set up a fund for children seeking diagnosis and Lyme treatment.Pat Smith Amy Tan Lyme Aid 4 Kids Lyme disease organizations to donate toAuthor, Amy Tan & LDA President,   Pat Smith at the Lyme Disease Association/Columbia Conference 2008 in San Francisco, California

We worked together with the LDA attorney and a Lyme literate physicians to devise a fund which we named LymeAid 4 Kids (LA4K). We announced the fund’s creation with Amy Tan at the LDA/Columbia 2003 Philadelphia Lyme & Tick-Borne Diseases scientific conference. She presented the initial check on stage to the LDA President.

Thanks to continued support from Ms. Tan and from people like you, since that time, the LDA has awarded $338,400, including $45,000 in 2016, for children from states all across the country, enabling children whose families face financial hardship to begin the process of a Lyme diagnosis and Lyme treatment.

amy tan lyme front linkIn 2015, according to CDC statistics, almost 400,000 new cases of Lyme occurred in the US. Children ages 5-9, 10-14 are at the highest risk of acquiring the disease, and the LDA has calculated that 30% of CDC reported Lyme cases are children ages 0-19, with 5% of the cases children ages 0-5. These are children who struggle every day to get out of bed, to shower or bathe, to do school work. Sometimes, children with chronic Lyme are unable to do one or more of those things for weeks, month, or years of their lives. Many grow up not remembering a time they were well and were unable to have friends, to play, or to attend school due to their Lyme disease symptoms.

The fund is almost depleted. LA4K applications to help our children continue to arrive. Your help is needed now; your donations of any amount are welcome. Join us in our fight to provide an early diagnosis and early treatment for the hundreds of thousands of children afflicted with this debilitating disease. Together, we can help prevent children across the United States of America from living The Eternal Nightmare.

                                                                                                                                                                 Click on Video Below

The Eternal Nightmare
We stand here…and wonder
why it is dark,
A haze covers our lives,
severing us from the world.
We search, grasp—there’s nothing to support us.
No longer do we laugh; we only cry grown up tears.
Our childhood is shattered, our souls stung and wounded.
Will sun rays ever reach
the children with Lyme?

This poem, written by a teen who had chronic Lyme & seizures, paints the bleak picture children who develop chronic Lyme often face. Together, author Amy Tan and the Lyme Disease Association (LDA) have worked to bring those “sun rays” to the children of Lyme.

Click here to read in East Brunswick Sentinel News: How a child helps other children with Lyme disease

 




Persister Treatment Published/Presented at LDA Conf.

 

The new findings in this just published article were presented at the LDA/Columbia conference on Oct. 16, 2016 by Dr. Ying Zhang, Johns Hopkins. Dr. Ying Zhang, Johns Hopkins School of Public HealthYing Zhang, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health

The research demonstrates the results of specific drug treatment for B. burgdorferi persisters, including single drug pulse dosing, combination drug pulse dosing; and which approaches are more effective at killing resistant biofilm-like microcolonies of persisters.  

Ceftriaxone Pulse Dosing Fails to Eradicate Biofilm-like Microcolony B. burgdorferi Persisters Which Are Sterilized by Daptomycin/Doxycycline/Cefuroxime Drug Combination without Pulse Dosing

Jie Feng1, Shuo Zhang1, Wanliang Shi1 and Ying Zhang1*

1Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University,

Click here to read abstract and article

Click here for Dr. Zhang Bio and Conference Talk Summary




LA4K Benefit by DE 87ers Basketball 2/17/15

 2015 delaware87ersheading

DELAWARE 87ERS, LYMEAID 4 KIDS PARTNER FOR SECOND SEASON
– Sevens, Delle Donne and University of Delaware College of Health Sciences to host LymeAid 4 Kids night –

NEWARK, DE – Feb. 13, 2015 – The Delaware 87ers today announced LymeAid 4 Kids night, presented by the University of Delaware College of Health Sciences, on Tuesday, Feb. 17 at the Bob Carpenter Center “The Bob.” Link to The Bob

The national non-profit Lyme Disease Association’s LymeAid 4 Kids fund raises monies for families who are struggling to pay for Lyme diagnosis and treatment, due to lack of insurance coverage for Lyme and financial hardship. The LDA has given out over $250,000 to help kids.
2015 delaware87ers
The 87ers will host the Westchester Knicks on Tuesday in an NBA Development League Atlantic Division contest. That night, the Sevens will wear special lime green shooting shirts that feature the LymeAid 4 Kids logo on the front, and the University of Delaware College of Health Sciences logo on the back. Each shooting shirt will be available for purchase via an auction at the game.

In partnership with the Lyme Disease Association, WNBA All-Star and Delaware 87ers goodwill ambassador Elena Delle Donne will make an appearance at the game, as the Sevens will host a number of activities featuring the former University of Delaware star.

The first 500 fans in attendance will receive a Rally Rag courtesy of University of Delaware College of Health Sciences. Before the game, Delle Donne will host a VIP event in the Club for Courtside Seat Holders. From the second quarter through halftime, the former Blue Hen basketball star will be signing autographs for $10, with all proceeds benefitting LymeAid 4 Kids. At halftime, the 87ers will draw a random lucky seat, and the winner will be upgraded to sit courtside next to Delle Donne for the duration of the third quarter.

 

TICKET INFORMATION

For tickets, please visit www.sevens.com/promo and ender the code LYMEAID, or call the 87ers office and speak to a representative at 302-504-7587.

About the Delaware 87ers
The Delaware 87ers of the National Basketball Association Development League (NBADL) were relocated to America’s first state in 2013 and named to commemorate the year in which Delaware ratified the U.S. Constitution, 1787. The Sevens are the NBADL affiliate of the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers and are owned by the Sixers. The 87ers play at the University of Delaware’s Bob Carpenter Center in Newark, DE.

About the NBA Development League
The NBA Development League is the NBA’s official minor league, preparing players, coaches, officials, trainers, and front-office staff for the NBA while acting as the league’s research and development laboratory. Featuring 18 teams with direct affiliations with NBA franchises for the 2014-15 season, the league offers elite professional basketball at an affordable price in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere. An all-time high 26 percent of all NBA players at the start of the 2014-15 season boasted NBA D-League experience. In fostering the league’s connection to the community, its teams, players and staff promote health and wellness, support local needs and interests, and assist in educational development through NBA D-League Cares programs. Fans can watch all NBA D-League games on nbadleague.com.

# # #

DELAWARE 87ERS PUBLIC RELATIONS
302-351-5377  87ersPR@sevens.com
________________________________________
Andrew Dzurita
PUBLIC RELATIONS
MANAGER
andrewdzurita@sevens.com