One tick bite can give people more than one tick-borne disease (co-infection).  In addition to Lyme disease, here are some other tick-borne diseases found in the US.

03 February 2012

Babesiosis is a Malaria-like illness caused by a parasite, Babesia microti, B. duncani, B. divergens, MO-1.  

It is sometimes fatal in the elderly or those with no spleen.  Babesiosis may be more severe in patients with co-existing Lyme disease.

Symptoms include: fever, chills, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, sweats and anemia.

Tests for Babesiosis: blood smears, IFA (IgG & IgM), FISH (Flourescent in-situ Hybridization) and PCR may be ordered.*

* These tests were developed & performance characteristics determined by independent labs. They have not been cleared or approved by the FDA; however, the FDA has determined such clearance is not necessary. They are designd for clinical purposes and should not be regarded as investigational or for research.  

Treatment is often atovaquone with azithromycin or clindamycin and oral quinine.  Treatments vary, examples provided as information only.

Ticks that transmit Babesiosis include; Ixodes Scapularis (also called blacklegged tick or deer tick) and Ixodes Pacificus (western blacklegged tick) both of which also transmit Lyme disease.  Multiple infections may be transmitted from the bite of the same tick.

Babesiosis has also been transmitted to humans through blood transfusions. 

©LDA.  2014.  2015. This web site provides practical and useful information on the subject matters covered. It is distributed with the understanding that LDA is not engaged in rendering medical or other professional services. Seek professional services if necessary.

 

03 February 2012

Bartonellosis is a disease caused by several Bartonella species transmitted either by a flea or a tick bite, cat scratch or lice. (Bartonella Henselae and/or perhaps other spp.)

When tick-borne, symptoms includes visual problems, headaches, significant lymph node enlargement, resistant neurological deficits and the new onset of a seizure disorder.

Diagnosis is based on acute and convalescent antibody titers (IFA) and/or positive PCR analysis.

Treatment may be combination macrolides, TCNs, rifamycin, (also possible Bactrim or fluoroquinolones). Treatments vary, examples provided as information only.

Ticks that transmit Bartonella include Ixodes Scapularis (also called the blacklegged tick or deer tick) and Ixodes Pacificus (western black legged tick), both of which also transmit Lyme disease.  More than one co-infection can be transmitted from the same tick bite.

©LDA.  2014.  2015. This web site provides practical and useful information on the subject matters covered. It is distributed with the understanding that LDA is not engaged in rendering medical or other professional services. Seek professional services if necessary.

Click album below for photos of Bartonella rashes  /index.php/resources/medical-photos/category/27-bartonella

2002 Paper by Martin D Fried MD and Aswine Bal MD

Bartonella henselae is associated with heartburn, abdominal pain, skin rash, mesenteric adenitis, gastritis and duodentis in children and adolescents.

The link below is a video clip from the LDA/Columbia University 2005 Medical Cconference, Lyme & Other Tick-Borne Diseases: Emerging Tick-Borne Diseases, held in Philadelphia. Brian Fallon, MD, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons is the session chair providing introductions.

Bartonella: A Clinicians' Viewpoint - Joseph Burrascano, MD

DVD (1, approximately 40 minutes) Joseph Burrascano, MD, Bartonella: A Clinician's Viewpoint, Philadelphia 2005, is now available. $10

$10.00

27 October 2014

Borrelia miyamotoi is a bacteria is in the relapsing fever group of  Borrelia. Although it’s not closely related to the Lyme disease bacteria, it can cause a Lyme-like-illness. 

Symptoms include fever, headaches, muscle aches and chills. Diagnosis is by PCR testing, at present, the test is not widely available.
 
Treatment is doxycycline.
 
Borrelia miyamotoi was identified in 1995 in ticks from Japan.  The bacteria has also been detected in two species of North American ticks, Ixodes scapularis (black-legged/deer tick) and Ixodes pacificus (western black-legged tick).  
 
©LDA.  2014. 2015.  This web site provides practical and useful information on the subject matters covered. It is distributed with the understanding that LDA is not engaged in rendering medical or other professional services. Seek professional services if necessary.
06 May 2015

Bourbon Virus (Thogotovirus)

Five cases of the Bourbon virus have been confirmed since it was first discovered in Bourbon County, Kansas, USA  in 2014.

Transmission: tick perhaps biting insects.

Symptoms: Fever, headache, tiredness, rash, other body aches, nausea, vomiting, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia.  May cause death due to acute illness.

No tests.

No treatment, except for supportive therapy for symptoms.

thogotovirus 729775Electron microscopic images virus particles from virus from CDC.

©LDA.  2015.  This web site provides practical and useful information on the subject matters covered. It is distributed with the understanding that LDA is not engaged in rendering medical or other professional services. Seek professional services if necessary.

04 February 2012

Colorado tick fever (CTF) is a disease caused by an RNA virus, Colorado tick fever virus (CTFV).  

Symptoms, which are oftern non-specific, begin 3 to 5 days after the bite with an abrupt onset of fever and any of these: headaches, chills, malaise, photophobia, myalgias, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain.  In 5 to 15%  of cases a rash occurs.  Neurologic complications may also occur.  50% of patients have single recurrence of fever (“saddleback” fever). 

IFA titers for diagnosis. PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) is the test most often used to diagnose the disease.  
CTF is transmitted by Dermacentor andersoni (Rocky Mt. wood tick) which causes illness from the western Black Hills to the West Coast in the USA.  Some cases of transmission through blood transfusion have been reported. 
Treatment consists of supportive care.

©LDA. 2014. 2015.  This web site provides practical and useful information on the subject matters covered. It is distributed with the understanding that LDA is not engaged in rendering medical or other professional services. Seek professional services if necessary.

Need Help Finding a Lyme specialist or doctor? Click below for our Doctor Referral Database.

 Doctor Referral Database

Lyme Disease Association, Inc.
PO Box 1438, Jackson, NJ 08527 

888-366-6611 | information line
732-938-7215 | fax
LDA@LymeDiseaseAssociation.org | email

Back to top